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5 things your winery can learn from Amazon

Sheri Hebbeln
Mar 09, 2016   |   Sheri Hebbeln Recommended for:   Marketing
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It should come as no surprise that Amazon is leading the way as far as ecommerce is concerned. Internet Retailer cited data from a study conducted by Kantar Media, Millward Brown Digital and Unmetric that found before Thanksgiving, Amazon's average daily share of attention was approximately 35 percent. On the other hand, nine other retail websites combined only garnered a 13 percent share of time spent on site.

It is important to understand how Amazon has become so successful because many online shoppers hold ecommerce sites to a much higher standard due to their experiences with a company. That said, here are five things you can learn from Amazon that will help your online wine store thrive:

1. Mobile friendliness is crucial
Amazon has made mobile optimization a core part of its user experience. According to Retail Touch Points, mobile traffic was responsible for 44 percent of the site's network traffic in January 2015, and 36 percent of all sales through its networks that month were made through mobile devices. Amazon leverages responsive design, which means users have a seamless experience regardless of the device they use. From easy payment options to thumb print recognition and a powerful, user friendly app, Amazon has successfully tapped into mobile commerce. Your online wine store can learn from the company by ensuring your properties are optimized for mobile.

2. Personalization is key
Consumers today expect personalized shopping experiences, and Amazon leads the way in meeting this demand. Not only does Amazon engage with consumers using customized emails, the site offers product suggestions based on previous purchases and successfully upsells shoppers through this tactic. If you're operating an online wine store, try to customize experiences as much as possible.

3. Shipping incentives are not optional
In 2014, Amazon reported the company earned more than 10 million new Amazon Prime members over holiday season. One of the main reasons Amazon has been successful is because of the option for Prime membership, which, for a small fee every year, gives shoppers free two-day shipping. Consumers expect shipping to be fast and cheap, and are more likely to purchase from an online wine store that offers these benefits.

4. Email marketing drives success
Email marketing is an extremely valuable ecommerce tool that Amazon has used effectively. Not only does the site follow up with customers to see how they have enjoyed their purchases, it alerts them when they've abandoned items in their shopping carts. Moreover, Amazon effectively uses customer data to ensure their email content is segmented and personalized.

5. Convenience is the new expectation
From shipping to the shopping experience and customer service, consumers today want convenience above everything else. This is especially important for wineries to remember because customers sacrifice the experience of visiting a tasting room or wine store in exchange for the convenience of online shopping. Amazon has consistently innovated to make its platform more accessible to customers and has created services that make their lives easier. Wineries can learn from Amazon's success by focusing on creating a memorable customer experience and building an online wine store that is easy to use.

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